Skip to main content
The recently held Russell L. Ackoff Centennial Celebration at Thomas Jefferson University was a great reminder of how valuable and durable Russ's ideas have proven to be. As was said at the celebration, he did not suffer fools and did not hand out compliments lightly which reminded me of one a the great moments in my professional life. Russ congratulated me on an article I had written:

From: Harold Nelson <nelsongroup@comcast.net> 
Date: April 6, 2006 10:56:33 AM MDT
To: Russell Ackoff <RLAckoff@aol.com
Subject: Thanks 
Dear Russ;
Thanks for your note. I appreciate comments on my work, especially positive ones. Hope you are staying well. I will not be at the ISSS meeting this year but hope our paths cross again at some point. 
Regards 
Harold 
-------------- Forwarded Message: -------------­From: RLAckoff@aol.comTo: nelsongroup@worldnet.att.netSubject: Your 1994 article on DesignDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 19:21:31 +0000 
Dear Dr. Nelson: 
I am ashamed to admit I have just come across yout 1994 article on 'The Necessity of Being 'Un-Disciplined..." I should have done so long ago. It's great. Belated congratulations. 
Russell L. Ackoff 
I am glad to say that the article (The Necessity of Being Undisciplined and Out of Control) has received a lot more attention since that exchange.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Center for Systemic Design draft prospectus

    PROSPECTUS Center for Advanced Systemic Designing Introduction  Our futures can be approached in four ways: 1) drifting—adapting to whatever happens,  2) colliding—reacting and enduring,  3) retreating—backing away from undesirable states or conditions, or   4) advancing—navigating into desirable states-of-affairs. The norm nowadays is to drift, collide or retreat into the future. The fourth approach, the proactive approach, is the more apt response given the complex challenges and rising expectations that are the new norm for the foreseeable future.  The fourth approach depends on the agency of individuals who have the capacity to handle the challenge of securing desired outcomes in indeterminate situations on behalf of concomitant stakeholders and clients. They achieve this by serving—design agency—as members of design teams and design cohorts. These systemic designers are skilled polymaths who have the ability to create assemblies of essential elements into coherent whole system

Design, Wicked Problems & Throwness

Horst Rittel is one of the seminal residents in my 'Berkeley Bubble'. Recently a friend and colleague sent me an article about ‘double-wickedproblems’ . I have become ever more aware of the increasing number of references to ‘wicked problems’ in all forms of media that seem to have missed Rittel’s deeper insights . This brought up the concern I have about the use and miss-use of the term ‘wicked problem’.  The term ‘wicked problem’, first introduced by Rittel in West Churchman’s seminars at Berkeley, was in reference to his conceptualization of the impossible challenge of dealing with significant social issues using traditional, rational, ‘problem solving’ methods. In most cases what are miss-diangnosed as ‘wicked problems’ are actually complex or complicated problems that can be simplified or broken into smaller 'tame' problems allowing for a straight forward 'problem solving' approach to be taken. This approach is believed by many to be capable

'sketch-note feedback' from keynote

  This is a sketch-note done of a recent keynote of mine. It is an invaluable form of feedback for a presenter. It shows what someone else heard from the presentation, how topics were related and what concepts were foreground and what were background — all from the perspective of an attentive listener. This is an invaluable service. Much more valuable than just a transcript of critical reviews. The sketch-note author in this instance is Manisha Laroia — Thank you Manisha.