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The recently held Russell L. Ackoff Centennial Celebration at Thomas Jefferson University was a great reminder of how valuable and durable Russ's ideas have proven to be. As was said at the celebration, he did not suffer fools and did not hand out compliments lightly which reminded me of one a the great moments in my professional life. Russ congratulated me on an article I had written:

From: Harold Nelson <nelsongroup@comcast.net> 
Date: April 6, 2006 10:56:33 AM MDT
To: Russell Ackoff <RLAckoff@aol.com
Subject: Thanks 
Dear Russ;
Thanks for your note. I appreciate comments on my work, especially positive ones. Hope you are staying well. I will not be at the ISSS meeting this year but hope our paths cross again at some point. 
Regards 
Harold 
-------------- Forwarded Message: -------------­From: RLAckoff@aol.comTo: nelsongroup@worldnet.att.netSubject: Your 1994 article on DesignDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 19:21:31 +0000 
Dear Dr. Nelson: 
I am ashamed to admit I have just come across yout 1994 article on 'The Necessity of Being 'Un-Disciplined..." I should have done so long ago. It's great. Belated congratulations. 
Russell L. Ackoff 
I am glad to say that the article (The Necessity of Being Undisciplined and Out of Control) has received a lot more attention since that exchange.

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